Tag: mythology

Mythic Symbols in Indo-European Paganism | Chris Godwin

Three Sources of Indo-European Myth

This is a simple overview of the most prevalent mythic symbols in Indo-European polytheism and comparative mythology, as it applies to Our Own Magic, which is my pet name for what we do.

I like focusing on Irish, Vedic and Germanic myths mostly because they are the best preserved of all the Indo-European sources, with all three containing strong Proto-Indo-European influences. If a practice exists in these three, it makes the strongest case that they are Proto-Indo-European, especially when supported by archeology, linguistics, and anthropological study.

See entire wonderful post here:

Source: Mythic Symbols in Indo-European Paganism | Chris Godwin

Magic to Heal the World – from Cerne to Cern – Philip Carr-Gomm

‘Root and branch shall change places
And the newness of the thing shall seem a miracle.
The healing maiden will return, her footsteps bursting into flame.
She will weep tears of compassion for the people of the land,
Dry up polluted rivers with her breath,
Carry the city in her right hand, the forest in her left
And nourish the creatures of the deep.
With her blessing Man will become like God waking as if from a dream.’

from Merlin: The Prophetic Vision and The Mystic Life
by R. J. Stewart

In the online course many of you have joined – Lessons in Magic – I give examples of how simple acts of ‘magic’ have changed people’s lives dramatically for the better. You may well have an experience from your own life that demonstrates this rationalist-mindset-defying possibility. In the course we then dive into how we can work with this – to improve our own lives but also to effect positive change in the world.

More at the link below!

Source: Magic to Heal the World – from Cerne to Cern – Philip Carr-Gomm

#OTD in 1873 – Birth of Blasket Island storyteller, Peig Sayers, in Dunquin, Co Kerry. – Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

IRISH HISTORY, CULTURE, HERITAGE, LANGUAGE, MYTHOLOGY

 

Born Máiréad Sayers in the townland of Vicarstown, Dunquinn, Co Kerry, the youngest child of the family. She was called Peig after her mother, Margaret “Peig” Brosnan, from Castleisland. Her father Tomás Sayers was a renowned storyteller who passed on many of his tales to Peig. At age 12, she was taken out of school and went to work as a servant for the Curran family in the nearby town of Dingle, where she said she was well treated. She spent two years there before returning home due to illness

More below:

Source: #OTD in 1873 – Birth of Blasket Island storyteller, Peig Sayers, in Dunquin, Co Kerry. – Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

The Enchanted Swans

The Enchanted Swans – available now!

Audio first chapter available here – listen now!

Based on the ancient Irish Fairy Tale, The Children of Lir

Winner – Books and Benches Readers’ Choice Book Cover Contest, February 2017

Winner – InD’Tale Magazine Crème de la Cover Contest, May 2017

Winner – Readers’ Favorite Silver Book Award 2017 (Fiction – Fantasy – General)

Finalist – Book Excellence Award 2017 (Fantasy)

In pre-Celtic Ireland, Fionnuala was a fae princess, born to a life of luxury. She knew her duty and loved her family. She missed her mother, who died in childbirth when Fionnuala was but ten years old. Still, she had hopes and dreams of love and a full life.

All her dreams were stolen from her, ripped away in a torrent of envy and magic.

Now she must care for her three brothers while learning to live under an evil curse. Will she find a way to break the spell, or would they remain swans, tethered to three places for nine hundred years?