Author: Christy Nicholas

The Creatures of Samhain | HubPages

The meaning of the word Samhain comes from Old Irish meaning “summer’s end,” from summer, samh and end, fuin. The modern Irish word for summer is samhradh, and Samhain is still the name for the month of November in Ireland. Celts considered sundown as the start of the day, which is why, though Samhain actually falls on November 1st, it would have been celebrated starting at sundown the night before, on October 31st. It is one of the four main festivals in Celtic tradition, making up the “quarter days,” the days between the equinoxes and solstices.

With Samhain comes a wide variety of supernatural creatures.

See more at the link below:

Source: The Creatures of Samhain | HubPages

The Matrilineal Culture of the Algonquian Peoples of Eastern North Carolina | Author Suzanne Adair

The coast of Eastern North Carolina was once home to an abundance of Algonquian tribes. The Iroquoian Tuscarora tribes were more influential within the Upper and Lower Inner Banks and Coastal Plain regions. These various Algonquian-speaking peoples occasionally formed loose affiliations and alliances, which, when paired with their overlapping cultural practices, sometimes blurred the lines of individual tribal identification.

The coast of Eastern North Carolina was once home to an abundance of Algonquian tribes. The Iroquoian Tuscarora tribes were more influential within the Upper and Lower Inner Banks and Coastal Plain regions. These various Algonquian-speaking peoples occasionally formed loose affiliations and alliances, which, when paired with their overlapping cultural practices, sometimes blurred the lines of individual tribal identification.

 

Read more of this excellent article here:

Source: The Matrilineal Culture of the Algonquian Peoples of Eastern North Carolina | Author Suzanne Adair

Lughnasadh in Ireland – Lora O’Brien – Irish Author & Guide

The 1st of August (sometimes the 2nd) is Lúnasa (Lughnasadh, Lughnasa, Brón Trogain) – the harvest festival in Ireland.

In her excellent book, ‘The Festival of Lughnasa’, Máire MacNeill wrote:

“Garland Sunday and Domhnach Chrom Dubh are two of the many names of a festival celebrated by Irish country people at the end of July or the beginning of August. It marked the end of summer and the beginning of the harvest season, and on that day the first meal of the year’s new food crop was eaten. The chief custom was the resorting of the rural communities to certain heights or water-sides to spend the day in festivity, sports and bilberry-picking.​”

Publisher: Folklore of Ireland Council; Reprint edition (January 1, 2008)

Buy the Book on Amazon.com Here.

Buy the Book from the Irish Publisher Here.

More of this excellent article on Lora O’Brien’s page:

Related Posts

Source: Lughnasadh in Ireland – Lora O’Brien – Irish Author & Guide

Mythic Symbols in Indo-European Paganism | Chris Godwin

Three Sources of Indo-European Myth

This is a simple overview of the most prevalent mythic symbols in Indo-European polytheism and comparative mythology, as it applies to Our Own Magic, which is my pet name for what we do.

I like focusing on Irish, Vedic and Germanic myths mostly because they are the best preserved of all the Indo-European sources, with all three containing strong Proto-Indo-European influences. If a practice exists in these three, it makes the strongest case that they are Proto-Indo-European, especially when supported by archeology, linguistics, and anthropological study.

See entire wonderful post here:

Source: Mythic Symbols in Indo-European Paganism | Chris Godwin

Time Tourist Outfitters, Ltd.

(Available in BOTH print and ebook, with audiobook coming soon!)

Amazon

Amazon.UK

Smashwords

Kobo

Nook/Barnes & Noble

Applebooks

Audiobook coming soon!

Wilda had retired from the Temporal Agents for an excellent reason.

Retired First Nations Temporal Agent Wilda just wants to run her Toronto shop, garb Time Tourists, and send them on their merry way into the past. She finds contentment in her cat, her sarcasm, and her whiskey. All that changes when a deathly ill Traveller literally fell onto her doorstep, setting off a chain of events which forces her to return to the job she’d retired from decades before.

The Agency sends her and her assistant, Mattea, back into three dangerous eras of history to find the disease vector threatening the life of every modern Traveller. She searches through a teeming desert bazaar amongst the luxury of the court of Mansa Musa. She explores the dark forests of pre-Columbian America, fighting against the heartbreak of true love. She gets entangled in the convoluted politics of twelfth century Norse-ruled Orkney, sifting through the horrific carnage of a murdered village.

If Wilda can’t return in time with the right pathogen, the modern scientists can’t synthesize a cure for the disease before all the Travellers fall ill. She has to navigate politics, bandits, camels, and midnight coup d’etats, complete her mission, and return to the present, or lose herself in the depths of her own purposely-forgotten past.

    

Magic to Heal the World – from Cerne to Cern – Philip Carr-Gomm

‘Root and branch shall change places
And the newness of the thing shall seem a miracle.
The healing maiden will return, her footsteps bursting into flame.
She will weep tears of compassion for the people of the land,
Dry up polluted rivers with her breath,
Carry the city in her right hand, the forest in her left
And nourish the creatures of the deep.
With her blessing Man will become like God waking as if from a dream.’

from Merlin: The Prophetic Vision and The Mystic Life
by R. J. Stewart

In the online course many of you have joined – Lessons in Magic – I give examples of how simple acts of ‘magic’ have changed people’s lives dramatically for the better. You may well have an experience from your own life that demonstrates this rationalist-mindset-defying possibility. In the course we then dive into how we can work with this – to improve our own lives but also to effect positive change in the world.

More at the link below!

Source: Magic to Heal the World – from Cerne to Cern – Philip Carr-Gomm